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The Cat of Bubastes Grace and Truth Books
  • ISBN: 1-929756-224
  • Binding: Mp3 CD
  • Page Count:
  • Publisher: Jim Hodges Audio Books

The Cat of Bubastes (G. A. Henty audiobook, read by Jim Hodges)

$25.00 $19.00

A Story of Ancient Egypt (1250 B.C.)

Read on audio MP3 by Jim Hodges.

Imagine living in a nation where killing a sacred cat is a capital offense! The Egypt of Pharaoh Thutmose III, in the times of Moses, was such a land. When Chebron, son of a priest, accidentally kills the sacred cat of Bubastes, his life becomes a series of harrowing adventures, with the only hope of safe haven for himself and his sister being a distant land, which can only be reached after fleeing through closely guarded Egyptian exits. Then they must embark on a challenging journey through unfamiliar lands populated by unfamiliar people and overcome numerous geographical obstacles.

G. A. Henty has produced a story which will give young readers an unsurpassed insight into the customs of the Egyptian empire.

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Description

The Cat of Bubastes

A Story of Ancient Egypt (1250 B.C.)

G. A. Henty in audiobook, read aloud by Jim Hodges

This book covers the oldest time period of any of the Henty novels. In it, young readers will learn much about the domestic life, customs, religion, and military system of ancient Egypt. Amuba, a prince of the Rebu nation on the shores of the Caspian Sea, with his charioteer Jethro, is carried into slavery after losing a battle with the Egyptians. They become servants of the house of Ameres, an Egyptian high priest, and are quite happy there, until the priest’s son accidentally kills the sacred cat of Bubastes. The locals rise up in rage and kill Ameres, and Jethro and Amuba must escape with the high priest’s son and daughter. After crossing the desert to the Red Sea, they eventually make their way back to freedom.

Imagine living in a nation where killing a sacred cat is a capital offense! The Egypt of Pharaoh Thutmose III, in the times of Moses, was such a land. When Chebron, son of a priest, accidentally kills the sacred cat of Bubastes, his life becomes a series of harrowing adventures, with the only hope of safe haven for himself and his sister being a distant land, which can only be reached after fleeing through closely guarded Egyptian exits. Then they must embark on a challenging journey through unfamiliar lands populated by unfamiliar people and overcome numerous geographical obstacles.

G. A. Henty has produced a story which will give young readers an unsurpassed insight into the customs of the Egyptian empire.

About G. A. Henty

George Alfred Henty, better known as G.A. Henty, began his storytelling career with his own children. After dinner, he would spend an hour or two telling them a story that would continue the next day. Some stories took weeks to finish!  A friend was present one day and, watching the spell-bound reaction of his children, suggested that Henty write down his stories so others could enjoy them. He did and, as the saying goes, the rest is history!   Henty wrote 144 books as well as numerous stories for magazines and became known as “The Prince of Story-Tellers” and “The Boy’s Own Historian.”  One of Mr. Henty’s secretaries reported that he would quickly pace back and forth in his study, dictating stories as fast as the secretary could write them down!

Henty’s stories revolve around fictional boy heroes caught up in the events of fascinating times in history. The heroes of Henty stories are diligent, intelligent, and dedicated to their country and cause in the face of great perils.  They fight in wars, sail the seas, make discoveries, conquer evil empires, prospect for gold, and participate in a host of other exciting adventures. Along the way, they cross paths with some of history’s most famous people.  Henty’s heroes live through tumultuous historic eras, meeting leaders of that time. Every reader of Henty will gain an understanding of nations and cultures, as these are conveyed as a natural element of the reading.  They’re one of the best ways to cultivate a taste for history in any reader!

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